Loading
Home
Personal
Business
Resources
Careers

Community Commitment

giving-back_2

Giving Back to Our Communities

Exchange Bank is a community bank. As a community bank, we differ significantly from national and regional banks. The major difference is our commitment to our community and our level of service to our customers. We have become partners with our neighbors by focusing only on our community, with an emphasis on making it a better place to live and work. We do this by investing in and giving back to the community in every way we can, with donations to local causes and non–profit organizations, and countless hours of employee volunteer time. When you do business with Exchange Bank, you directly benefit the community in which we all live and work.

Exchange Bank gives of its time and resources. Each year hundreds of hours and hundreds of thousands of dollars are invested back into our communities. See our most current list of community donations.

A Tradition of Giving

Exchange Bank continues the tradition of community involvement the Doyle family began. We are proud to make a difference in our communities.

Community Involvement

Our employees participate in countless community
non–profits, especially:

The Human Race, Sonoma County
The Human Race, an annual fund raising event hosted by the Volunteer Center, benefits Sonoma County nonprofit agencies. For more than 15 consecutive years, Exchange Bank has been named Corporate Champion in our division for raising the most monies to benefit Sonoma County Non–Profits. Our dedicated employees and our generous customers have helped us accomplish this annual goal.

Sacramento Police Officers Association
Exchange Bank donates funds each year for scholarships to the Sacramento Police Officers Association Memorial Scholarship Fund in the
name of law enforcement officers who have died
in the line of duty.

Rebuilding Together
Each year Exchange Bank employees and family members participate in Rebuilding Together’s “National Rebuilding Day.” The last Saturday in April, volunteers from coast–to–coast gather to revitalize the houses of low–income homeowners in their communities to help ensure they live in warmth, safety, and independence. The homeowners must be elderly, disabled, or families with children who cannot do the work themselves. Volunteers are assisted by skilled trades people who also donate their time.