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Online Banking Browser FAQs

If you do not find an answer to your question(s) below, please contact us. We’d be happy to help you.

Q: What are Exchange Bank’s requirements for approved browsers?

A: Exchange Bank’s requirement for Online Banking is 128–bit encryption, the highest commercially available encryption standard. The following browsers meet this standard:

  • Windows XP/2000/98/95/NT, Windows 3.1
  • Microsoft® Internet Explorer 4.01 or later
  • Netscape Communicator 4.6 – 4.72 or later
  • Netscape Navigator™ 4.06 – 4.08 or later

Macintosh PowerPC:

  • Microsoft® Internet Explorer 4.6 or later
  • Netscape Communicator 4.6 – 4.72 or later
  • Netscape Navigator™ 4.06 – 4.08 or later
  • Mozilla Firefox 1.0
  • Safari 1.2

Macintosh 68K:

  • Netscape Navigator™ 4.06 or later

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Q: Why do I need to upgrade my browser?

A: For security reasons, certain browsers ability to perform secure transactions has expired. In order to maintain its high degree of customer security, Exchange Bank will not be able to allow access to customers using these browsers. Customers using the older browsers will need to upgrade to the newer version of their favorite browser to enjoy the benefits of home banking online. To upgrade to the latest version of your favorite browser, visit Microsoft or Firefox.

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Q: What is a browser and what does it do?

A: A browser is what enables you to visit Web sites and view Web pages on your computer screen. Just as a word processor is the software you use to write letters and papers with your computer, a browser is the software you use to surf the Web.

In essence, a browser handles all the work that goes into searching for and viewing Web pages. So, for example, when you type “http://www.exchangebank.com”, your browser understands what this means and knows how to instruct your computer to find that Web site.

Once you get to a site, your browser knows how to turn the programming instructions sent over the Internet into a meaningful Web page. If your browser didn’t understand this code, you couldn’t read Exchange Bank logo at the top of this screen.

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Q: What makes one browser more secure than another?

A: Browsers offer varying degrees of security, particularly in regard to encryption. Some browsers allow you to encrypt information, so that the information is scrambled as it passes over the Internet.

  • Some browsers offer more secure forms of encryption than other browsers.
  • Even the same version of a browser can come with different levels of encryption. (Netscape Communicator 4.7, for example, comes with either 56–bit standard encryption or the more secure 128–bit encryption.)
  • These issues are of critical importance to Exchange Bank, and we evaluate browsers to ensure they meet our requirements for Online Banking. Our security standards are among the most strict of any company conducting business on the World Wide Web.

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Q: How do I know if my banking session is encrypted?

A: In order to use some of the best forms of cryptography available commercially for use over the Internet, Exchange Bank encrypts your Online Banking and Bill Pay sessions within our banking servers. This provides you with stronger security. When you visit other Web sites, you can determine if encryption is being used on a given Web page by looking for the icons in the lower portion of your browser. If no icon shows, browser is not secure.

  • Netscape Navigator displays the encryption icon in the lower left corner of the browser.
  • In addition, Netscape Communicator displays the icon in the navigation toolbar.
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer displays the icon in the lower right corner of the browser.
  • If you use Netscape Communicator 4.6 or later, you can click on the icon displayed to determine what level of encryption is being used for a particular Web page.
  • If you use WebTV, you need to press the info button on the keyboard (or, if using the remote control, select the options button and then select info). If a “Security Details” button displays on the screen, the page is secure. Select this button for more information.

All Exchange Bank–approved browsers provide detailed information on security levels. See your browser’s help or documentation for more information.

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Q: Why is my browser’s security important for Online Banking?

A: Most browsers allow you to get to Exchange Bank’s home page and view informational pages. Exchange Bank’s stringent security standards take effect when you apply for a product, view your account information, or do any other banking–related activity that requires high levels of security.

Exchange Bank determines whether the browser you’re using is approved for Online Banking. Among the many security features we look for when evaluating browsers, the following are particularly important:

  • Encryption. Browsers play a vital role in encryption, so Exchange Bank tests browsers to make sure they provide the encryption level required for Online Banking.
  • No storage of account information. Normally, when you surf the Web, your browser temporarily stores information in your computer’s memory. However, when you view pages in an Online Banking session, Exchange Bank prevents your browser from storing information. That means that after you end your Online Banking session, no one can use your browser or computer to find information about you and your accounts.

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Q: What’s the difference between 128–bit and 40–bit or 56–bit encryption?

A: The main difference is that 128–bit encryption provides a significantly greater amount of cryptographic protection than 40–bit encryption. The difference between these types of encryption is one of capability. 128–bit “high” or “strong” encryption is exponentially more powerful than 40–bit or 56–bit standard encryption. Think of it this way:

  • Standard encryption (40–bit or 56–bit) — means there are 240 or 256 possible keys that could fit into the lock that holds your account information but only one that works for each Online Banking session. So there are many billions of possible keys that could potentially get to your account information, but only one that works each time you bank online.
  • “High” or “strong” encryption (128–bit) — means there are 2128 (if you were to write the number down it would be 34 with 38 zeroes after it) possible keys that could fit into the lock that holds your account information, but only one that works for each Online Banking session. So a hacker attempting to get to your account information would need to use a computer with exponentially more processing power than for 40–bit or 56–bit standard encryption to find the correct key.

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Q: How can I maximize my browser’s security?

A: Both Microsoft Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator or Netscape Communicator have built–in security features. If you use the Microsoft Internet Explorer browser, find out how you can use your browser’s built–in security features. If you use the Netscape Navigator browser, find out how you can maximize your browser’s security.

Microsoft Internet Explorer browser — steps you can take to use its built–in security features:

  • First, we recommend that you set your browser’s safety level to “Medium.” To do this:
    • Select “View” from the menu bar at the top of your browser and then select “Options”.
    • When the “Options” screen displays, you’ll see a series of tabs at the top.
    • Select the “Security” tab.
    • Then select the “Safety Level” button near the bottom of that screen.
    • The screen that displays will allow you to set your security level to medium.
  • Second, we recommend that you exercise caution if an ActiveX control, a type of program that can be downloaded from the Internet, is about to be downloaded to your computer. Downloaded ActiveX programs can take complete control of or even destroy your computer. To find out about the Web site or publisher, click on the information provided on its security certificate before you download an ActiveX program. Again, be cautious if you see certificates from unknown Web sites or Web publishers. Most certificates give you the option to turn off future certification notices. Do not select this option if you wish to carefully monitor the source of the programs which you download onto your computer.
  • Third, you have several other options under the “Security” tab that allow you choose what types of software can be downloaded onto and run on your computer. If you’re particularly concerned about safety, you can choose to:
    • Not allow the downloading of ActiveX content
    • Disable ActiveX controls and plug-ins
    • Not run ActiveX scripts
    • Disable Java programs

     

    To make any of these selections, uncheck the boxes at the bottom of the “Security” tab within the “Options” menu of your Internet Explorer browser.

Netscape Navigator browser — steps you can take to maximize its security:

  • First, if you use the Netscape Navigator browser to download programs from the Internet, you should know that Netscape will only accept an ActiveX control, a type of program that can be downloaded from the Internet, if you choose to purchase a plug–in. Plug–ins are software programs that extend the capabilities of Netscape Navigator in a specific way. (For example, one of the plug–ins that allows you to accept ActiveX controls is NCompass ScriptActive™.) We recommend that you exercise caution if an ActiveX control, a type of program that can be downloaded from the Internet, is about to be downloaded to your computer. Downloaded ActiveX programs can take complete control of or even destroy your computer. If you previously purchased and installed this plug–in and are particularly concerned about security, these are the steps you can take to disable this plug–in:
    • First, go to “Options” in the menu at the top of your Netscape browser and select “General Preferences”.
    • On the “General Preferences” screen, select the “Helpers” tab.
    • You can then remove the plug–in from your “Helper” menu list.
  • Second, if you download programs from the Internet onto your computer, it’s a good idea to find out about the program’s publisher or Web site. Additionally, you may want to only download programs from known or reliable sources.

If a security certificate is presented to you when downloading a program from the Internet, you may be given the option to turn off future certification notices. Do not select this option if you wish to carefully monitor the source of the programs which you download onto your computer.

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This site contains links to other web sites, in order to assist users in locating and accessing information that may be of interest. Exchange Bank does not warrant linked sites for any purpose. Further, the inclusion of a link to another site does not constitute an endorsement by Exchange Bank of the site, its owner(s) or any products or services advertised on the linked site.